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Magdalena Rudowska
East Sussex, UK

Magdalena Rudowska, a Polish designer and artist, skillfully fuses interior design, fashion, fine art drawing, and ceramics into her creative tapestry. Her ceramic practice breathes life into the age-old tradition of clay vessels, which have held a special place in human history for millennia. Rooted in the raw beauty of nature, she selects clay as her canvas, allowing her to sculpt and capture fleeting emotions and sensuality within these timeless forms, forging a profound connection between the past and the present. 

Magdalena gained a MA Interior Design 2008 from Academy of Fine Arts in Gdansk, Poland in 2008. She also completed an online Drawing Development Year at The Royal Drawing School, London in 2021/22.

 

 

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'Spiky Raw Candelabra', stoneware, h. 19.5 cm

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What are you looking for in a final piece? 

"In the final piece, I seek a harmonious marriage of form and texture. I want my ceramics to be not just visually compelling but also irresistibly tactile. My goal is to invite viewers to experience my art beyond sight, enticing them to touch and feel the intricate details of the forms I've crafted."

 

How important is tactility in your work?

"Tactility is paramount in my work; it connects me to nature, echoes a rich cultural heritage, and offers a therapeutic escape. Engaging with clay bare-handed relinquishes rationality for an intuitive interplay with the material, making the creative process dynamic and profoundly rewarding."

What drew you to hand-building?

"Handbuilding is my chosen process, a journey marked by the joy of embracing unpredictability and the constant learning that each unique clay body offers. It's a playful, experimental approach that allows me to be a co-creator in shaping the dynamic and emotionally resonant narrative of each piece."

 

How does the location of your home come into your work?

"Living by the Baltic Sea infuses my work with the essence of the coastal landscape. Though not always consciously incorporated, the shapes, textures, and muted colors of the sea and forest become ingrained in my pieces. My ceramics, therefore, bear the subtle imprints of the surroundings that saturate my daily visual experience."

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Available Work

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