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Details

Buff stoneware with glaze

H. 15 x w. 13 x d. 16.5 cm

 

"‘Coronavase’ (as the title suggests) was made in the first UK Covid-19 lockdown. I had time, and the luxury of my little studio to work in. Experimenting in clay became incredibly cathartic, offering an escape from the global confusion. Out of this initial period emerged a series of vessels with playful characters and curious faces, in which I was intuitively pinching and coiling, allowing forms to emerge without prior design. It had been instinctive to add tongues onto the characters’ mouths, and it was only on reflection and discussion with others that I realised they appeared to be coughing. I had created a series of ‘coughing’ vessels in the height of the pandemic, which I feel was a beautifully whimsical way for my brain to try to process what was happening around me."

 

 

About Pascale Wilson

Pascale Wilson is a Bristol based ceramicist who loves to create character-rich artworks. She combines simple forms with faces, patterns and bold colours to spark narratives.

 

Handbuilding is a slow and freeform production method, allowing her to organically discover characters while making. Her work is reminiscent of Pre-Columbian art, using repeated patterns, animal and human forms, and an intrinsic playfulness, inspiring a sense of myth and curiosity. Her interest in psychological states, dreams, and our collective mental landscape underpins her work, driving her to seek understanding through making.
 
Pascale studied Fine Art (BA Hons) at Bournemouth, creating colourful and playful costumes, sculptures, and installations using reclaimed materials. Following this, while living in Bristol she discovered ceramics as a new hobby, attending evening classes. This hobby quickly developed into a passion for working in clay as a means to creative expression. In 2021 she was awarded DYCP funding from the Arts Council England which enabled her to dive into her practice, exploring new ideas, and developing teaching for adults. She now teaches regular handbuilding courses in Bristol, complimenting the development of her sculptural work, as well as creating pieces on commission. 

 

 

Artist Q&A

What first drew you to hand-building with clay?

P: I was initially taught both handbuilding and throwing, but was very much drawn to the meditative pace and the childlike, intuitive process of sculpting clay. I was never that focused on function, so pinching, coiling and sculpting clay into character rich forms was my instinctive direction.

 

What are you thinking about when you start making each piece? Do you work in series?

P: A lot of my work is a tool for me to explore my mind. Psychological states, dreams, and our collective mental landscape underpins my work, driving me to seek understanding through making. Sometimes I create an individual piece to tell a very specific narrative, or to experiment with a technique. Other times I will create a series, linked by the same techniques and surface decoration, diving into a wider topic. Often a series will originate from a group of drawings done in one sitting, which I feel need to exist together to tell a bigger story.

 

What’s your favourite reaction that you can create?

P: I am drawn to colour and pattern, particularly African and Latin American designs. This inspiration led me into using coloured slips and sgraffito to bring my pieces to life. The process of carving through clay is incredibly satisfying, and I enjoy the immediate decorative effect as opposed to the unknown waiting game of glazing! 

 

‘Coronavase’ (as the title suggests) was made in the first UK Covid-19 lockdown. I had time, and the luxury of my little studio to work in. Experimenting in clay became incredibly cathartic, offering an escape from the global confusion. Out of this initial period emerged a series of vessels with playful characters and curious faces, in which I was intuitively pinching and coiling, allowing forms to emerge without prior design. It had been instinctive to add tongues onto the characters’ mouths, and it was only on reflection and discussion with others that I realised they appeared to be coughing. I had created a series of ‘coughing’ vessels in the height of the pandemic, which I feel was a beautifully whimsical way for my brain to try to process what was happening around me.

Coronavase | H. 15 cm | By Pascale Wilson

£460.00Price
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